Litter Info

 

Call us to inquire about available litters!

 

Deposits

    We sell our puppies as pets with the potential to show. Puppies are sold only on AKC Limited Registration unless under certain circumstances. In order to purchase a puppy we require a deposit. When a deposit is received, your name will be put on the waiting list according to time and date we receive it and the puppy is considered sold. 

 

Health Warranty

    Puppies have a 30 month guarantee against hip displayisia. Puppies will have received 1st vaccination and will be wormed 3 to 4 times before they are taken home. Our puppies are ready to go to a good home at 8 weeks old. A good puppy food is vital to your puppy's development along with daily exercise.

If you are not happy with the puppy or circumstances arise that you cannot take care of the puppy we will take the puppy back.

    Our Labs are A.K.C. registered and have pedigrees with champion lineage. All sires and dams are DNA tested, OFA Certified, and have health clearances on their hips and elbows before breeding.

 

    Our Puppies will come with a health certificate, guarantee, pedigree, vet exam.

 

About the Labradors:

    Labradors are relatively large, with males typically weighing 70 to 90 lb and females 55 to 70 lb. Labradors weighing close to or over 100 lb are considered obese or having a major fault under American Kennel Club standards, although some Labradors weigh significantly more. The majority of the characteristics of this breed, with the exception of colour, are the result of breeding to produce a working retriever.

As with some other breeds, the Conformation (typically "English", "show" or "bench") and the Field (typically "American" or "working") lines differ, although both lines are bred in both countries. In general, however, Conformation Labradors tend to be bred as medium-sized dogs, shorter and stockier with fuller faces and a slightly calmer nature than their Field counterparts, which are often bred as taller, lighter-framed dogs, with slightly less broad faces and a slightly longer nose. However, Field Labradors should still be proportional and fit within American Kennel Club standards. With Field Labradors, excessively long noses, thin heads, long legs, and lanky frames are not considered standard. These two types are informal and not codified or standardised; no distinction is made by the AKC or other kennel clubs, but the two types come from different breeding lines. Australian stock also exists; though not seen in the West, they are common in Asia. These dogs are also very good with children.

 

    The AKC describes the Labrador's temperament as a kind, pleasant, outgoing and tractable nature. Labradors' sense of smell allows them to home in on almost any scent and follow the path of its origin. They generally stay on the scent until they find it. Navies, military forces and police forces use them as detection dogs to track down smugglers, thieves, terrorists and black marketers. Labradors instinctively enjoy holding objects and even hands or arms in their mouths, which they can do with great gentleness (a Labrador can carry an egg in its mouth without breaking it). They are known to have a very soft feel to the mouth, as a result of being bred to retrieve game such as waterfowl. They are prone to chewing objects (though they can be trained to abandon this behavior). The Labrador Retriever's coat repels water to some extent, thus facilitating the extensive use of the dog inwaterfowl hunting.

Labradors have a reputation as a very even-tempered breed and an excellent family dog. This includes a good reputation with children of all ages and other animals.Some lines, particularly those that have continued to be bred specifically for their skills at working in the field (rather than for their appearance), are particularly fast and athletic. Their fun-loving boisterousness and lack of fear may require training and firm handling at times to ensure it does not get out of hand—an uncontrolled adult can be quite problematic. Females may be slightly more independent than males. Labradors mature at around three years of age; before this time they can have a significant degree of puppy-like energy, often mislabelled as being hyperactive. Because of their enthusiasm, leash-training early on is suggested to prevent pulling when full-grown.Labradors often enjoy retrieving a ball endlessly (often obsessively) and other forms of activity (such as agility, frisbee, or flyball).

Although they will sometimes bark at noise, especially noise from an unseen source ("alarm barking"), Labradors are usually not noisy or territorial. They are often very easygoing and trusting with strangers and therefore are not usually suitable as guard dogs.

 

    Labradors have a well-known reputation for appetite, and some individuals may be highly indiscriminate, eating digestible and non-food objects alike. They are persistent and persuasive in requesting food. For this reason, the Labrador owner must carefully control their dog's food intake to avoid obesity and its associated health problems.

 

    The steady temperament of Labradors and their ability to learn make them an ideal breed for search and rescue, detection, and therapy work. They are a very intelligent breed. They are ranked # 7 in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs. The AKC describes the breed as an ideal family and sporting dog. Their primary working role in the field continues to be that of a hunting retriever. The Labrador is considered #1 american family dog.